WBUC prepares next generation of film and television creators



WBUC Station Manager Tyler Dohse, right, talks to his news anchors Ashley Finch and Nicholas Holland before a taping of the daily morning announcements. The station provides students with a hands-on opportunity to work with television and film technology.Minutes before show time, Tyler Dohse, station manager at Oswego High School’s WBUC, has his hands full.
 
An interview subject has bailed at the last moment, throwing off a planned segment. The sports anchor is working through a proposed tagline to end his broadcast. Scripts are being loaded into the teleprompter. 
 
Dohse has one last quick chat with his on-air talent then sits down just out of view of the three cameras pointed at the news desk.
 
“Quiet on set!” Dohse, a senior, yells to the production studio filled with more than a dozen of his OHS classmates.
 
At Dohse’s signal, the cameras roll. It’s Wednesday morning and WBUC is on the air.
 
Each day, the Oswego High School’s television and film production studio records the morning announcements, broadcast throughout the school. It’s a rigorous daily routine and Dohse, who’s known he wanted to be a filmmaker since he was in middle school, is now running the show.
 
“When I walked in as a freshman, I looked in the room and just said, ‘wow, this is amazing,” Dohse said. “I knew I had to get involved.”
 
Students at WBUC work with professional-grade camera and lighting equipment, sound mixing technology and visual effects. It’s one of the most popular and ambitious curriculums at OHS.
 
Through a partnership with Cayuga Community College, students taking certain WBUC-related classes and under certain requirements are eligible to earn college credits, giving them a leg-up on the competition once leaving the OHS studios.
 
“Getting started here as really helped me with my communication and management skills,” Dohse said. “It teaches those really pivotal things and no matter how it needs to get done, we get it done. You have to have a passion for it.”
 
Providing students with the opportunity to practice real-world skills with state-of-the-art technology is crucial to the Oswego City School District’s mission and vision of creating a student-centered environment that produces fully prepared and life ready community members.
 
Joe Clavelli, OHS Class of 2014, left WBUC with an entire semester worth of college credit and is now on the verge of completing his Bachelor of Arts Degree in Broadcasting from SUNY Oswego.
 
“It’s so important that I started at WBUC because I wouldn’t be where I am today without that first step,” said Clavelli, who has already landed a job with News Channel 9 in Syracuse putting his skills to work in television production.
 
“It’s all hands-on, we’re not just sitting in a classroom listening to a lecture,” said Clavelli of his days taking WBUC classes, where he worked both behind the camera and on-air for his “Morning Cup of Joe” segment. “We got to learn all the equipment, and it gave me the idea of what I wanted to do. It was fun and different every day.”
 
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